The Giving Tree – a Community Christmas Tradition

I don’t know what happened to the originally filed post, but it is gone in favour of my stock making video.  I have re-written and re-posted this article.

Our mother survived skin cancer, a brain aneurysm and a mini stroke only to die in her sleep in her 67th year.  With those regular reminders of our human fragility, my memories of our mother are very strong.

GivingTreePicThe year before she died, I was out West visiting and we were out for a long walk.  This is something all the women in my family share, a love of long walks, preferably with dogs winding between our feet.  Mom had taken me down to Sandy Beach, a rare place in Calgary with trees and water.  In this place, as children and teens, our Mom and Auntie Joan had floated down the river on inner tubes, skipped school to suntan and smoke, had bbq’s and likely kissed boys.

Not very far down the path, the Christmas snow well trodden by others, we came upon a small coniferous tree covered in all kinds of decorations.   I was delighted.  My mother explained it as the Giving Tree, because it gives people the same feeling it gave me.  Mom said someone starts by placing one decoration secretly and soon others follow.

When we moved to our new house, I chose a tree in one of our local urban forests to start this tradition.  It took weeks for people to cotton on, but now each year the Giving Tree emerges over the first two weeks of December.

How-To start your own tree.

Find a path that is well walked within your own Community.

Choose a Tree that ideally is coniferous, but mostly one that is the perfect size for the small and the tall to reach the branches.

When the snow flies or by December 1st, start with two or three homemade or store bought decorations.  Keep in mind they may be pilfered or broken, so don’t have any attachment to them.

Try not to let anyone see you decorating.

Even if you are not joined, I guarantee it will give an unexpected delight.  To encourage people to join, add some more each day and leak the story to other parents or neighbours.

Take the decorations down after January 7th and put them in a basket, so people can take them back if they wish.  If not keep them till next year, or gift some to others who want to start their own Giving Tree, or donate them.

*This article, nor it’s content, has any association with the book, The Giving Tree.

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